Course Description Handbook

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ART

ART APPRECIATION (1 Credit – Elective) The Art Appreciation course is designed to give the student knowledge and appreciation of the visual arts. In addition to the study of Western Art History, the student will develop an understanding of art through critical thinking in studio work rather than the mastery of specific skills. Following an introduction to 2-D design and formal art criticism, the major focus of the class is the development of the Western Art tradition beginning with Prehistoric Art through Contemporary Art of today. The course includes lecture, discussion, collaborative work, written essays, quizzes, and hands-on studio production experiences.

ART I: Fundamentals of Art & Design (1 Credit – Elective)  This art course will introduce students to the fundamentals of art and the elements of two-dimensional design, including line, shape, volume, value, texture, space and color.  In addition, the students will be exposed to a variety of materials, gain knowledge of art history, and experience art criticism. The course includes lecture, discussion, written essays, quizzes, and hands-on studio production experiences.

ART II: Illustration & 3D Design (1 Credit – Elective) This secondary-level art course provides the student with a comprehensive experience in a variety of media, including two-dimensional and three-dimensional studio work. In addition to studio production of artwork, the student is exposed to other areas of study: art appreciation, art history and criticism. The course includes lecture, discussion, written essays, and quizzes. Outside class work is required. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Art I.

HONORS ART III (1 Credit – Elective) This course offers the serious student an opportunity to explore in-depth the following areas: drawing, painting, printmaking, sculpture, and digital media. Included in the curriculum are the following areas of study: studio production, art appreciation, art history and criticism. The course includes lecture, discussion, written essays, and tests. Students will be required to complete outside class work that includes drawings, sketches, and written essays. This course is designed in a two-year cycle to allow students the opportunity to take the class during their junior and senior years.  Prerequisite: Successful completion of Art II.

GRAPHIC DESIGN (1 Credit – Elective) This introductory course in graphic design provides the student an opportunity to take the process of design from idea generation to completion.  Students will learn how to combine images, text, and the elements/principles of design to create sophisticated projects. Study will include various applications of graphic design: advertising, product design, computer-aided design, illustration, and community-based projects when applicable. The course includes lecture, discussion, written essays, and quizzes. Outside class work is required. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Art I.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) STUDIO ART (1 Credit – Elective) This course offers the serious art student an opportunity to explore the creative as well as the systematic investigation of formal and conceptual issues in art making. Students work independently to develop and practice technical skills and learn that making art is an ongoing process of informed and critical decision-making. The students choose an area of concentration and build an AP studio art portfolio of up to 30 pieces. The portfolios are submitted for review in the spring for possible college credit. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Honors Art III and teacher recommendation following a portfolio review.

BUSINESS EDUCATION

COMPUTER SKILLS I (1 Credit – Graduation Requirement) In this course using MS Office 2013, students will learn computer skills that will serve both personal needs and prospective employer essentials. Specifically, through an in-depth exploration of Microsoft Word and PowerPoint and an introduction to Microsoft Excel and Publisher, students will work through lessons that are hands- on and outcome driven. This is a beneficial class for all students, regardless of career choice.

COMPUTER SKILLS II (1 Credit – Elective) This course using MS Office 2013, is designed to expand upon the knowledge gained in Computer Skills I.  Students will acquire an in-depth understanding of Microsoft Excel and Access.  Students will also gain exposure to Google applications, cloud computing and the Web 2.0 world which will enhance the students’ technical ability. This is a great technology-filled class for students to become more productive in the business world. Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Computer Skills I.

PERSONAL FINANCE & FOUNDATIONS OF BUSINESS (1 Credit – Elective – Graduation Requirement) The goal of this course is to help students become financially responsible, conscientious members of society.  To reach that end, this course develops students’ understanding and skills in areas of money management, personal budgeting, financial goal attainment, the wise use of credit (credit cards, car loans, mortgages, etc.), insurance (auto, life, health home, etc.) investments (includes an actual live stock market game), and consumer rights and responsibilities. Students will also explore career choices that best fit their personality and interests while understanding that a good career match directly correlates with future happiness and financial health. This course will give students the opportunity to enter adulthood armed with a better understanding of how money works, and how to make it work for them.

ACCOUNTING I (1 Credit – Elective) Students will learn how to analyze and record business transactions.  Financial statements will be prepared with an emphasis on how the numbers affect business decisions.  Students will also study the importance of ethics in accounting through the use of real world case studies.  This is a very popular class among students and is extremely beneficial for students interested in studying business after high school.

ACCOUNTING II (1 Credit – Elective) Students will continue building on their basic accounting knowledge acquired in Accounting I.  This course will deal with corporations and partnerships and accruals.  Students will also work with computerized software in accounting. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Accounting I

ENTREPRENEURSHIP/MARKETING/MANAGEMENT (1 Credit – Elective) Students will learn about business ownership and the role entrepreneurs play in today’s society.  Through several integrative projects and lecture, students will learn about our free enterprise system and the role management, marketing and entrepreneurship play in our global economy.  This is a great course for students who want to study business after high school or desire to start their own business. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Computer Skills

HONORS NET PREP I (1 Credit – Elective) This course is designed to give students a general overview of computer hardware, repair and installation as well as networking.  Students will have an opportunity to learn the steps in building a personal computer as well as general trouble shooting solutions for today’s computer system.  Students will also build a local area network along with the required data cabling.  Current software and technology gadgets will also be researched throughout the course.  This is a great course for students interested in technology and who enjoy hands-on labs.

HONORS NET PREP II (1 Credit – Elective) Students will further their knowledge in hardware, software and computer networking.  Students are also introduced to network operating systems and applications to operate LANs.  Students will also assist PC Hardware & Other Technologies students in all lab activities.  Prerequisite: Successful completion of Honors Net Prep I

THE FORT (SCHOOL STORE OPERATIONS) (1 Credit – Senior Only Elective) Students will gain hands-on experience in managing the school store, “The Fort.”  This course will involve the study of basic retail operations and store management, including consumer behavior, location and site analysis, merchandising practices and policies, retail advertising, layout and display, as well as other basic retail management responsibilities. Business ethics, accountability, and professional cooperation will be stressed.

YOUR EMPLOYABILITY SKILLS (YESTM) (1 Credit – Senior Only Elective) This course is designed to prepare students to meet the needs of the employment community and to develop employability skills through seven major areas of study.  The areas of study include:  communication, teamwork, personal development, technology, safety and health, quality and math.  In order to earn YES certification, students must pass a TABE Employability Test, Wonderlic Test (same test the NFL football players take), a six-panel drug screening and reach a daily attendance rate of 95%.  All students who earn a Y.E.S. certificate will have their personal resume sent out to all Northwestern and Northeastern Pennsylvania manufacturing employers involved in this program. 

HONORS VIDEO GAME & COMPUTER PROGRAMMING (1 Credit – Elective) Students will learn introductory computer and video game programming using Alice and Visual Basic 2012.  This is a MUST course for anyone interested in video game design!  Alice allows students to learn basic programming concepts by creating animated movies and simple video games.  In Alice, 3-D objects populate a virtual world and students create programs to animate the objects; 3D graphics and a drag-and-drop environment make programming a more engaging and a less frustrating first programming experience.

YEARBOOK PRODUCTION  (1 Credit – Elective) This course will enable students to further develop their skills in language arts, computer literacy, business/management, creative arts/graphic design, and printing knowledge.  Students interested in writing, computer software, photography, or marketing careers might wish to consider this elective course.  Students may elect to take one or two semesters of Yearbook Production. This course will include after school and/or additional time. Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation/Application

 ENGLISH

ELEMENTS OF LITERATURE (1 Credit – 9TH Grade)  The ninth grade English program will provide the student with an overview of the English language through the study of literature (novel, short story, poetry, and drama) and writing.  The goal of English 9 is to provide the student with a clear understanding of how to use our language effectively in both written and oral communications. The student of English 9 will be exposed to various genres of literature, will receive practice in evaluating the merits of what he/she reads, and will be introduced to the library and MLA documentation.

HONORS ELEMENTS OF LITERATURE (1 Credit – 9th Grade) The honors ninth grade English program will provide the student with an overview of the English language through the study of literature (novel, short story, poetry, and drama) and writing.  The literature program will emphasize the student’s appreciation and understanding of literary technique. The writing program will stress the structure of the sentence which will lead itself finally to paragraph writing (language mechanics is included). A 90% average in 8th grade Advanced English is recommended for enrollment in this course.

READ 180 (1 Credit Per Semester – 9th Grade Elective) This course is a two semester course that addresses individual reading needs through the use of instructional software (computers), high interest literature, and systematic small group direct instruction. The software collects data based on individual responses and adjusts instruction to meet each student’s skills in decoding, word recognition, fluency, comprehension, vocabulary and spelling. The computer individualizes instruction. The independent reading of high interest literature builds fluency and expands vocabulary through reading practice. Small group instruction allows the teacher to provide explicit instruction in reading comprehension, fluency, vocabulary, word study and writing techniques.

WORLD LITERATURE (1 Credit – 10th Grade) The emphasis in this general English course is on understanding our language so that it can be more effectively utilized in written and oral communication.  An anthology of world literature will form the basis, although supplemental materials will be provided for enrichment.  Students will conduct research and document sources using MLA format.  Grammar is geared toward the student striving to improve composition, grammar, usage, and semantics.

HONORS WORLD LITERATURE (1 Credit – 10th Grade) Honors English 10 is a college preparatory class, which focuses on writing, speaking, reading and listening to develop communication skills. Reading assignments include the outside reading of six novels per year as well as reading from the literature book which includes fiction, nonfiction, drama and poetry. Writing assignments include five-paragraph compositions (informative and persuasive) as well as creative examples (poems, narratives, etc.)  Students will conduct research and document sources using MLA format. Speaking and listening skills are developed in oral presentations, cooperative learning experiences and class discussions. A 90% average in Honors Elements of Literature is recommended for enrollment in this course.

READING SKILLS (1 Credit – 10th Grade Elective) This course focuses on enhancing students' comprehension, vocabulary, fluency, decoding, and word recognition skills. Instructional software, reading fluency passages, high interest fiction and notification passages, and large and small group instruction will be used to enhance proficiency in reading skills. Instruction will be based on the individual needs of the student based on the results from instructional software and other assessments.

LITERARY ANALYSIS (1 Credit – 11th Grade Elective) This course focuses on enhancing students’ ability to analyze and synthesize literary texts, with an emphasis on critical thinking. High-interest reading passages and large and small group instruction will be used to increase student mastery of literary skills and improve higher-order thinking. While some fiction will be read, most literary works will be nonfiction. Instruction will be differentiated to meet the individual needs of students, based on both formative and summative assessment results.

AMERICAN LITERATURE (1 Credit – 11th Grade) English 11 focuses on writing, speaking, reading, and listening to develop clear and concise communication.  Designed as a survey of American Literature, this course is geared to the practical applications of language that people need to function well in society.  Areas of study include vocabulary, usage and mechanics, paragraph development, essay writing, exposition, descriptive writing, public speaking, debate and American literature.

HONORS AMERICAN LITERATURE (1 Credit – 11th Grade) Honors English 11 is a course designed primarily for the college-bound student  The curriculum is a survey of American writing, which includes short stories, poetry, drama, and non-fiction.  The student is required to read several American novels to supplement the literature from the text.  Composition skills are taught primarily in conjunction with the literature study. Special attention is given to essay writing. Because this is a weighted course, the grading standards are higher than those of English 11.  Also the difficulty and the quantity of the material covered is greater, which requires that homework assignments be more extensive. An 85% average in Honors World Literature is recommended for enrollment in this course.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION (1 Credit – 11th Grade)  AP English Language and Composition aligns to an introductory college-level rhetoric and writing curriculum, which requires students to develop evidence-based analytic and argumentative essays that proceed through several stages or drafts. Students evaluate, synthesize, and cite research to support their arguments. Throughout the course, students develop a personal style by making appropriate grammatical choices. Additionally, students read and analyze the rhetorical elements and their effects in non-fiction texts, including graphic images as forms of text, from many disciplines and historical periods.  A 90% average in Honors World Literature is recommended for enrollment in this course.

BRITISH LITERATURE (1 Credit – 12th Grade) English 12 focuses on writing, speaking, reading, and listening to develop clear and concise communication. Designed for the average student, this course is geared to the practical applications of language that people need to succeed in the work force. Areas of study include vocabulary, usage and mechanics, the creation of a resume, public speaking, debate and a concentration on the progress of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to contemporary works.

HONORS BRITISH LITERATURE (1 Credit – 12th Grade) Honors English 12 is a college preparatory class which focuses on writing, speaking, analyzing, reading and listening to develop clear and concise communication.  Reading and writing assignments are extensive and varied in order to widen students’ experiences and to make the transition to college requirements easier.  The student will learn to recognize the political, social, and philosophical influences evident in English literature and to understand the development of the English language.  Though all forms of discourse will be developed in the study of composition, the emphasis of the writing for the course will be on expository writing.  An 85% average in Honors American Literature is recommended for enrollment in this course.

ENGLISH RESEARCH (.5 Credit – 12th Grade Graduation Requirement) English 12 Research focuses on the satisfactory completion of a Pennsylvania state approved, persuasive senior research paper and presentation. The research paper will be created through different means of research to prepare students to use outside sources. There will be a concentration on paragraph development, mechanics, formal essay writing and proper citation of sources using the MLA writing style. The course will also require the students to utilize their strengths to create a project that can successfully present the information gathered in the research process in a professional manner to faculty and peers.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION (1 Credit – 12th Grade) AP English Literature and Composition aligns to an introductory college-level literary analysis course. The course engages students in the close reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature to deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure. As they read, students consider a work’s structure, style, and themes, as well as its use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone. Writing assignments include expository, analytical, and argumentative essays that require students to analyze and interpret literary works. Successful completion of AP English Language and Composition OR a 90% average in Honors American Literature is recommended for enrollment in this course.

JOURNALISM (1 Credit – Elective) Journalism will be devoted to publications such as the school newspaper and local newspaper releases. Students will explore the ethics of journalism, evaluate the reliability of news sources, and learn to write various types of articles including news, features, editorials, and personality profiles. They will be expected to conduct interviews that may require time outside of the regular school day.

SAT PREP (1 Credit – Elective) SAT Prep is a course designed primarily for the college-bound student.  This semester course consists of nine weeks of English and nine weeks of Math preparations for the SAT test. The course will focus on academically challenging skills to prepare the student for demanding careers and post-secondary education.  The student will learn test strategies, as well as sharpen verbal and math skills.  Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I and Algebra II.  Can be taken concurrent with Geometry.  Also listed in the Math section.

CREATIVE WRITING (1 Credit- Elective) This is a workshop-type course that presents an overview of creative writing genres and techniques with an emphasis on creative thinking. Throughout the semester students will explore three major units of study: fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. Students will read and study published compositions from a variety of artists, and will be expected to produce written work in these genres. Students are expected to write every day.  A major portfolio featuring revised pieces will be submitted at the conclusion of the course. 

FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE

FOOD AND NUTRITION I (1 Credit – Elective) This course is for the student who wants to learn about the art of cooking.  Each week teacher demonstrations and guided food laboratory experiences help students to develop basic food preparation skills.  The importance of nutrition and its relationship to individual health and well-being is stressed with every unit studied.  Students will also participate in a food safety certification program (Serv Safe) recognized by the National Restaurant Association. 
 FOOD AND NUTRITION II (1 Credit – Elective)  In this course, students learn the nutritional value, selection, storage and preparation of fruits, vegetables, grain products, legumes, nuts and seeds, dairy foods, eggs, meat, poultry, fish and shellfish.  A philosophy of wellness is taught so that students can understand the importance of making good food choices. Students will participate in food labs with the life skills students on a weekly basis.  They will also be introduced to the diversified cooking styles of the countries around the world. Ethnic foods of many countries are researched, prepared and served.
CHILD DEVELOPMENT (1 Credit – Elective) This course is designed for the student interested in understanding the growth and development of children. Theories and principles of a child's development from birth through age twelve are studied. Emphasis is given to the physical, emotional, intellectual, and social growth of the child. Students will also participate in an authentic parenting simulation program called "Baby Think It Over.”

 WORLD LANGUAGE

SPANISH I / SPANISH II (1 Credit) Spanish I and II introduce basic, useful vocabulary and grammar structures of the Spanish language. Each lesson is accompanied by some cultural and geographical information. In Spanish II the students continue learning through a variety of partner and group activities, but they will have opportunities to create their own conversations as they become more familiar with the logic and structure of the Spanish language. Prerequisite: Students must successfully complete Spanish I to move to Spanish II.

HONORS SPANISH III (1 Credit – Elective)  Spanish III reviews the material acquired in the first two levels in Spanish and then introduces more difficult vocabulary and complex grammar. More emphasis is placed on reading and writing, with the students being required to write more lengthy compositions. Prerequisite: Students must successfully complete Spanish I and II. 

HONORS SPANISH IV (1 credit - elective) In Spanish IV, students will synthesize all information learned in the previous three levels. They will be able to navigate all past, present, and future tenses using a wide range of acquired and learned vocabulary. The purpose of this class is to create and experiment with language while simultaneously refining and individualizing Spanish use to suit personal needs, opinions, and ideas in a variety of communicative endeavors. This class will be largely conducted in Spanish and will continue to explore culture utilizing authentic resources alongside our Descubre 2 text. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish I, II, and III. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) SPANISH (1 Credit - elective) In AP Spanish, students will utilize all previously learned vocabulary and grammar to interpret authentic texts, participate in interpersonal conversation, and present unique concrete and abstract ideas to their peers. Students will use Spanish to navigate real work tasks like meeting new people, job interviews, trip planning, ordering in a restaurant, and other everyday situations. Much of this course is left largely up to students choice, needs, creativity, and interests. The majority of the materials employed in AP Spanish are authentic texts, meaning that they are created by native Spanish speakers' specifically for other native Spanish speakers. These can include but are not limited to movies, music, books, articles, newscasts, interviews, performances, poetry, and art. This course is on that will prepare students to extemporaneously use their Spanish in the world outside of the classroom. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish I, II, III, and IV. PENDING BOARD APPROVAL FOR THE 2017/18 SY. 

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

PHYSICAL EDUCATION – GRADES 9, 10, 11 and 12 (.5 Credit Each – 2 Credits Total for Graduation) This course will provide the opportunity for students to learn basic skills, rules, and strategies for various team sports.  The student will also develop knowledge in personal fitness, muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and cardio-respiratory endurance.  A variety of work outs including the use of the fitness center, heart rate monitors, and several sport and life time activities will be conducted to improve overall fitness.

HEALTH – GRADE 9 (.5 Credit – Graduation Requirement) This course covers the systems of the body, sexually transmitted diseases, first aid, and safety.  It also covers the effects of drugs, alcohol, and tobacco on the body and the role they play in the student’s overall wellness.

HEALTH – GRADE 11 (.5 Credit – Graduation Requirement)  This course covers units including six health components, life skills, relationships, stress, emotions, nutrition, fitness, human reproduction, sexually transmitted diseases, HIV/AIDS, alcohol, tobacco, other drugs and social issues relating to healthy decision making, and responsible sexuality.

PRE-ENGINEERING, MANUFACTURING, AND INDUSTRIAL   TECHNOLOGY

MATERIALS PROCESSING (1 Credit – Elective) This course teaches basic mechanical drawing and measuring skills, proper material use, and safe and proper machine operations. Students will choose a project to design, produce and test. Examples of some popular projects include bookcases, coffee tables, end tables, and nightstands.

CABINET MAKING (1 Credit – Elective) Students will have an opportunity to develop carpentry skills by creating a woodworking project.  Students will design a project and determine a proper timeline to complete this project. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Materials Processing.

COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING I (1 Credit – Elective) Computer Aided Drafting I is designed to familiarize students with drawing processes, terminology, techniques and job opportunities created by the drafting, design and industrial technology sector of today’s work force.  Students will develop skills through hands-on activities by completing technical drawings using the latest computer aided drafting software.  Approximately two weeks will be used to develop mechanical sketching skills, lettering and refining basic math and geometry skills, the remaining time will be used exploring the uses and applications of our CAD software.  Computer Aided Drafting I should be an integral part of a well-rounded school program that helps students discover occupational interests and career opportunities.

COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING II (1 Credit – Elective) Computer Aided Drafting II is designed to be a continuation of Computer Aided Drafting I utilizing the computer as a drafting tool.  As a result of completing this course students will learn to use Auto CAD and Inventor software as a drawing aide to build on visualization and designs skills developed in Computer Aided Drafting I and will discover concepts found in multiview, sectional view, and pictorial representations.  The CAD software will also be used to generate geometric constructions and assist in our major design project (FLB Bridge Building). Prerequisite: Successful completion of Computer Aided Drafting I

ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING (1 Credit – Elective) This class is primarily concerned with the study of residential drawing and design.  Students will utilize the CAD software to gain knowledge and experience through the design and development of a floor plan, foundation plan, detail elevations, elevation drawings, and plot plans.  Upon completion of this course students will have designed a semi complete set of residential drawings.  This course is developed as a student driven designed based class where assignments are driven by the student’s ideas and creativity.  Prerequisite: Successful completion of Computer Aided Drafting I

HONORS COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING III (1 Credit – Elective) This course is designed to be a continuation of Computer Aided Drafting II.  As a result of this course, students will build on visualization skills developed in previous drafting courses, and discover concepts and techniques for creating auxiliary, pattern developments, thread designs, and working drawings.  Students will utilize Auto CAD and Inventor 3-D modeling software’s to complete the assigned problems.  Students will develop design projects based on the systems model that utilizes input, process, output and feedback.  Prerequisite: Successful completion of Computer Aided Drafting I and Computer Aided Drafting II

HONORS PRE-ENGINEERING (1 Credit – Elective) Pre-engineering is a sequential course offered to students who are interested in all fields of design and who have successfully completed Computer Aided Drafting I and Computer Aided Drafting II.  Students taking this course will continue to develop computer aided drafting skills through the completion of advanced technical drawings and modeled parts including assemblies.  These advanced skills will be applied in hands on design problems where students will work both independently and in small groups to solve design problems.  These problems will require brainstorming, goal setting, research, design application, test models, testing, analyses, and communications.  All design problems will be solved using the systems model of input, process, output, and feedback to achieve set goals.  Prerequisite: Successful completion of Computer Aided Drafting I and Computer Aided Drafting II

MATHEMATICS

(Students will be placed in math classes according to skill level)

INTEGRATED MATH I (1 Credit) Integrated Math I is designed to better prepare students for Algebra I and the Pennsylvania Keystone Exam: Algebra. This course will be an introduction to basic algebra concepts.

ALGEBRA I (1 Credit) Algebra I is an introduction to the structure of algebra (the real number system).  Emphasis is placed on the following: acquiring facility in applying techniques and concepts, the need for precision of language, and the perception of the role of deductive reasoning in algebra.  This class is also designed to prepare students for the Pennsylvania Keystone Exam: Algebra.

INTEGRATED MATH II (1 Credit)  Integrated Math II is a refresher course designed for students who would benefit from more skill building practice on the key concepts of Algebra II. 

ALGEBRA II/ HONORS ALGEBRA II (1 Credit) Algebra II is an extension of the concepts of Algebra I.  Emphasis is placed on the following: acquiring proficiency in applying techniques and concepts, the need for precision of language, the perception of the role of deductive reasoning in algebra, and comprehension of the function concept and its importance in mathematics. Honors Algebra II is an accelerated math class in which Algebra II concepts are taught in a more rigorous fashion.

GEOMETRY/ HONORS GEOMETRY (1 Credit) The primary purpose of this course is two-fold.  First, it will supply the student with a reservoir of geometric information that can be used in everyday living and also as a prerequisite to more advanced mathematics.  Second, it will provide an experience for the high school student that is basically deductive in nature. Honors Geometry is an accelerated math class in which Geometry concepts are taught in a more rigorous fashion.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) STATISTICS (1 Credit) We use statistics every day in our lives. Whether it is in the fields of economics, manufacturing, government, science, engineering, public health, or sports, statistics allow us to solve problems and make daily decisions. In this class, students will not only be aware of the world of statistics, but more importantly how to use statistics to make informed decisions. we will study the data analysis process, method of collecting data, designing surveys and experiments, graphical and numerical methods to describe data, bivariate data and random variables, as well as many other sampling and variability techniques.  

HONORS PRE-CALCULUS  (1 Credit) The first half of this course will cover basic trigonometry concepts including: circular functions, proof of identities, solution of trigonometric equations, graphing of trigonometric functions, solutions of triangles, use of vectors and DeMoivre’s Theorem. The second half of this course will be devoted to studying topics in algebra that are not covered in Algebra II. Some of the topics include exponential and logarithmic functions, sequences, counting principle, probability and matrices.

HONORS CALCULUS (1 Credit) The emphasis of this course is on the study of linear functions, quadratic functions, limits, the derivative as it is related to maximums and minimums, and the anti-derivative as it is related to others.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) CALCULUS AB (1 Credit) The Advanced Placement Calculus AB class is the first of the two AP Calculus classes offered.  It is designed to provide an opportunity to challenge the most capable mathematical minds, and improve their analytical reasoning skills and study habits. Students will study elementary functions, limits and continuity, derivatives, the definite integral, applications of both the derivative and integral, and L’Hopital’s Rule. Students may choose to take the Advanced Placement Calculus AB test after completing this course.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) CALCULUS BC (1 Credit) The Advanced Placement Calculus BC class is the second of the two AP Calculus classes offered.  It is designed to provide an opportunity for students to increase their understanding of limits, derivatives, and integrals. Students will study parametric equations, polar functions, vectors, polynomial approximations, polynomial series, and the Taylor series. Students may choose to take the Advanced Placement Calculus BC test after completing this course. Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Advanced Placement Calculus AB.

SAT PREP (1 Credit – Elective) SAT Prep is a course designed primarily for the college-bound student.  This semester course consists of nine weeks of English and nine weeks of Math preparations for the SAT test. The course will focus on academically challenging skills to prepare the student for demanding careers and post-secondary education.  The student will learn test strategies, as well as sharpen verbal and math skills.  Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I and Algebra II.  Can be taken concurrent with Geometry.  Also listed in the English section.

MUSIC

CONCERT BAND (1 Credit – Elective) The Concert Band is Fort LeBoeuf’s premiere wind and percussion stage ensemble. Through the rehearsal and performance of standard Concert Band repertoire, students will learn the following: an advance sense of intonation and internal pulse, sight reading techniques, major and minor scales, a variety of time signatures and key signatures, how to play a variety of musical and cultural styles.

JAZZ BAND (1 Credit – Elective) Jazz Band is available to students in grades 9-12. This involves playing in a traditional big band setting. Students will study and perform all jazz styles including funk, rock and swing music. There will be a minimum of one to two evening performances. Course grades will be determined by in-class tests and mandatory attendance at performances.

MUSIC THEORY (1 Credit – Elective) This course is focused on learning the theory of music. The elements we will learn are notes, chords, scales, styles/genres and music history. We will use this information to learn how to write and analyze music. We will also use this class for small group or solo performing on your instrument or voice. This is the perfect course for anyone who wants to go into music in college or if you just want to learn music on a more advanced level.

ORCHESTRA (1 Credit – Elective) The orchestra is available to students in grades 9-12. Through the rehearsal and performance of standard orchestral repertoire, students will learn the following: an advanced sense of intonation and internal pulse, sight reading techniques, major and minor scales, a variety of time signatures and key signatures, and how to play a variety of musical and cultural styles. The orchestra will perform two evening concert. The first concert will be a Christmas concert, performed with the band and chorus. The second concert will be based on standard orchestral literature as well as contemporary pieces.

VOCAL ENSEMBLE / BROADWAY DINNER THEATER (1 Credit – Elective) Vocal Ensemble / Broadway Dinner Theater is open to any student in grades 9-12. Students enrolled in this ensemble are required to participate in various evening concerts in the second semester. One of the major performances will include a weekend of Broadway dinner theater performances. In this course student will study and research the stories and songs from various Broadway musicals chosen by the director. Students will in turn, prepare these pieces for solo and duet performances for the Broadway dinner theater production. Students will be directly involved in all aspects of the dinner theater production from organization and planning to serving food for the dinner theater performances. The other concerts will be based on standard choral literature as well as contemporary pieces.

SCIENCE

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE I (1 Credit) Environmental Science I examines introductory environmental concepts and expands scientific literacy through a One Health perspective. Students will study ecology principles, focusing on energy flow, interactions and relationships in an ecosystem, the importance of biodiversity to maintain a livable planet, local and global conservation efforts, human's impact on the Earth, societal changes necessary for a sustainable future and local and global human population demographics. Through labs, lectures, discussions, films and readings, students will be exposed to fundamental ecological principles covered on the Pennsylvania Keystone Biology Exam and build a foundation of scientific understanding critical for the secondary level Biology course. 

BIOLOGY (1 Credit) Biology is an introductory course that fulfills the life science requirement for graduation and the course curriculum is aligned with the Pennsylvania Academic Standards for Science and Technology and Environment & Ecology. Biology is the study of living organisms and their interactions with each other and their environment.  During the course we will be covering information including: biochemistry, cells, animals, bacteria and viruses, genetics, ecology, environmental issues and evolution.  By the end of the course the students should have a general understanding of how living organisms function and are interdependent on one another. The biology course incorporates a variety of learning methods, including: hands-on and virtual labs, inquiry-based and project-based activities, demonstrations, lectures, and discussions. The students are required to use critical thinking skills to analyze data, and draw conclusions.

HONORS BIOLOGY (1 Credit) Honors Biology is designed for students who are motivated and have a good work ethic. This course fulfills the life science requirement for graduation and the course curriculum is aligned with the Pennsylvania Academic Standards for Science and Technology and Environment & Ecology. Biology is the study of living organisms and their interactions with each other and their environment.  During the course we will be covering information including: biochemistry, cells, animals, bacteria and viruses, genetics, ecology, environmental issues and evolution.  By the end of the course the students should have a general understanding of how living organisms function and are interdependent on one another. The students will be using a variety of 21st century skills including, but not limited to, the use of critical thinking and problem solving, communication and collaboration, as well as individual accountability. The biology course incorporates a variety of learning methods, including: hands-on and virtual labs, inquiry-based and project-based activities, demonstrations, lectures, and discussions. The students are required to use critical thinking skills to analyze data, and draw conclusions.

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE (1 Credit – Graduation Requirement) This course is designed and adapted especially for those students who have been identified as having special needs. The content of the course is similar to introductory biology; however, a less detailed curriculum has been developed. This course fulfills the life science requirement for graduation and the course curriculum is aligned with the Pennsylvania Academic Standards for Science and Technology and Environment & Ecology. Biology is the study of living organisms and their interactions with each other and their environment.  During the course we will be covering information including: biochemistry, cells, animals, bacteria and viruses, genetics, ecology, environmental issues and evolution.  By the end of the course the students should have a general understanding of how living organisms function and are interdependent on one another. The biological science course incorporates a variety of learning methods, including: hands-on and virtual labs, inquiry-based and project-based activities, demonstrations, lectures, and discussions. The students are required to use critical thinking skills to analyze data, and draw conclusions.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) BIOLOGY (1 Credit – Elective) The AP Biology course at Fort LeBoeuf High School is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester college introductory biology course.  The AP Biology course differs significantly from the usual first high school course in biology with respect to the kind of textbook used, the range and depth of topics covered, the type of laboratory work done by students, and the time and effort required of students.  The textbooks used for AP Biology are those used by college biology students. The kinds of labs done by AP students must be the equivalent of those done by college students. The AP Biology course is designed to be taken by students after the successful completion of a first course in high school biology and one in high school chemistry as well. It aims to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology. Accordingly, goals have been set for percentage coverage of three general areas: Molecules and cells - 25%, heredity and evolution - 25%, and organisms and populations, 50%. Students may take the optional AP test given in May of each year for possible college credit.  Also, a mandatory summer assignment is a requirement that must be completed before the course begins and internet access at home is required to complete the many online assignments given during the course. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology and Chemistry with a 92% and teacher recommendation.

CHEMISTRY I / HONORS CHEMISTRY I (1 Credit – Elective)  This course is open to sophomores, juniors and seniors who are interested in taking a general survey course in chemistry, and who are interested in such professions as nurse, engineer, chemist, pharmacist, technician, geologist, etc.  In general, it is recommended for those students who want to pursue careers in medicine, engineering, and other science and related fields. Areas of study in Chemistry I include the metric system, solutions, phases of matter, chemical and physical changes, gas laws, mole concept, balancing chemical reactions, atomic structure, and writing formulas for compounds, acids, and bases, and the periodic table. The structure of the course will be laboratory oriented with lecture, classroom discussion, and filmstrips or films.

HONORS PHYSICS I (1 Credit – Elective) Honors Physics I is a course designed to prepare the student for college physics. It challenges students to incorporate critical thinking and problem solving skills. Both a mathematical and conceptual approach will be taken. The emphasis is on both learning concepts and mathematical reasoning. Physics takes a "hands on" laboratory approach in attempting to explain the natural phenomena and physical loaws that govern the universe. Laboratory experiences, with clearly stated purposes and step-by-step instructions or inquiry based, along with helpful, supporting information, accelerate the learning of these concepts. Topics covered: One Dimensional Motion and Graphing, Vectors, Two Dimensional Motion, Forces and Newton's Laws of Motions, Work and Energy, Momentum, Angular Motion, and Rotational Dynamics. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) PHYSICS 1: MECHANICS (1 Credit – Elective) Algebra-Based it is the equivalent to a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound. It will also introduce electric circuits. Students may take the optional AP test given in May of each year for possible college credit. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Honors Physics I.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) PHYSICS 2: THERMODYNAMICS & ELECTRICAL (1 Credit – Elective) Algebra-Based it is the equivalent to a second-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course covers fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, optics, atomic and nuclear physics. Students may take the optional AP test given in May of each year for possible college credit. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Honors Physics I.  While AP Physics I is not a requirement for AP Physics 2, AP Physics 2 is a more challenging course without it.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE II (1 Credit – Elective) Environmental Science II expands upon topics introduced in Environmental Science I, but is a stand alone course for any interested student that has already passed the Keystone Biology Exam. Through the lens of a One Health perspective, students will learn about current global environmental issues impacting planet Earth. Climate change, pollution, human resource use and management,habitat fragmentation, agricultural practices and land use, illegal wildlife trade environmental hazards in relation to human health, and waste management will be covered among other topics. Using case studies, hands on laboratories, lectures, discussions, trips to local facilities, films, the novel No Impact Man and project based learning, students will understand the benefits of an environmental stewardship way of life. 

GENERAL PRACTICAL SCIENCE 11/12 (1 Credit – Elective-11TH Grade) This course will serve as a remediation class for the Biology Keystone exam. The course will cover all of the anchors and essential materials necessary for successful completion of the Biology Keystone.

HONORS CHEMISTRY II (1 Credit – Elective)  Chemistry II is open to those junior and senior students who have had Chemistry I and are intending to pursue a career in medicine, engineering, and other science and related fields. Areas of study in this course include oxidation-reduction, titration, organic compounds, and radioactivity.  The topics covered in this course are dealt with in more depth and more rigorously than those in Chemistry I. The structure of the course will be laboratory oriented with lectures, classroom discussion, and filmstrips or films. Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Chemistry I.

HUMAN ANATOMY (1 Credit – Elective) In this course, students study the eleven human body systems. As an introduction to the course, students become familiar with anatomical terminology and the related prefixes and suffixes.  For each body system, students will discover the major functions, organs, and structure.  Emphasis will be placed on the relationships among the different body systems.  Prerequisite: Successful completion of Health 9.

HONORS ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I: FOUNDATIONS (1 Credit – Elective) Students will become familiar with descriptive terms for location and positions of various body structures. Directional terms and anatomical terms will be stressed as they pertain to each system.  The systems covered in detail are the skeletal system, the muscular system, the nervous system emphasizing the brain’s physiology, the special senses, and the endocrine system. Students taking Honors Anatomy & Physiology I in their junior year will be expected to complete senior-level work.  Prerequisite: Successful completion of Health 9. Successful completion of Human Anatomy is recommended but not required.

HONORS ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II: BODY REGULATION AND INTEGRATION (1 Credit – Elective) Students will become familiar with descriptive terms for location and positions of various body structures. The systems covered in detail are the cardiovascular system emphasizing the heart and circulatory routes, the lymphatic system with an emphasis on immunities, the respiratory system focusing on the exchange of gasses, the digestive system emphasizing nutrition and metabolism, and the reproductive system with a focus on physiological processes. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Honors Anatomy & Physiology I.

HONORS ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY III: BODY MAINTENANCE (1 Credit - Elective) The systems examined in detail wold include the special senses: the eye and vision, the ear-hearing and balance, and the chemical senses - smell and taste, the endocrine system with a focus on hormone production and regulation, the urinary system with a focus on electrolyte balance, the reproductive system with an emphasis on physiological processes, and the development of the human embryo from conception until birth. Students taking Body Maintenance in their junior year will be expected to complete senior-level work. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Honors Anatomy & Physiology I or Human Anatomy with teacher recommendation.

SOCIAL STUDIES

UNITED STATES HISTORY I (1 Credit – 9th Grade) This freshman level course provides a one-semester survey of American history from the Colonial Period and the American Revolution to the beginning of World War One.  Using an online textbook, primary documents and current events, student will learn about the various political, social and economic developments that have shaped and continue to shape the United States.  Reading, writing and critical thinking are emphasized as integral ways of understanding how the past relates to the present and future.  Students will be asked to do independent work, research and be active participants in class discussions and projects.  All Social Studies classrooms are equipped with laptop chrome books to enhance the educational experience.

HONORS UNITED STATES HISTORY I (1 credit - 9th Grade) This freshman level course provides a one-semester survey of American history from the Colonial Period and the American Revolution to the beginning of World War I. Using an online textbook, primary documents and current events students will learn about the various political, social, and economic developments that have shaped and continue to shape the United States. Reading, writing, and critical thinking are emphasized as integral ways of understanding how the past relates to the present and future. Honors United States History I will feature extensive proficiency in writing, reading, and research. Students should possess excellent study skills, self-motivation and the ability to work well independently. Advanced assessments will be used to master and showcase critical thinking skills, deeper content knowledge and the understanding of complex social and political issues. All Social Studies classrooms are equipped with chromebooks to enhance the educational experience. 

UNITED STATES HISTORY II (1 Credit - 10th Grade) This sophomore level course provides a one-semester survey of American History from World War I to present day United States History. Using an online textbook, primary documents and current events, students will learn about the various political, social and economic developments that have shaped and continue to shape the United States. Reading, writing, and critical thinking are emphasized as integral ways of understanding how the past relates to the present and future. Students will be asked to do independent work, research and be active participants in class discussions and projects. All Social Studies classrooms are equipped with chromebooks to enhance the educational experience. 

HONORS UNITED STATES HISTORY II (1 Credit - 10th Grade) This sophomore level course provides a one-semester survey of American History from World War I to present day United States History. Using an online textbook, primary documents and current events, students will learn about the various political, social, and economic developments that have shaped and continue to shape the United States. Reading, writing, and critical thinking are emphasized as integral ways of understanding how the past relates to the present and future. Honors United States History I will feature extensive proficiency in writing, reading, and research. Students should possess excellent study skills, self-motivation, and the ability to work well independently. Advanced assessments will be used to master and showcase critical thinking skills, deeper content knowledge and the understanding of complex social and political issues. All Social Studies classrooms are equipped with chromebooks to enhance the educational experience. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE (1 Credit – 11th Grade) Political Science will acquaint students with all aspects of American federal, state and local government. Included in this course will be the foundation of democracy, the legislative, executive and judicial branches of government along with their roles and functions, rights and responsibilities of American citizens, and political and economic systems found around the world. This course will encourage students to explore political issues and become active participants in American society.

HONORS POLITICAL SCIENCE (1 Credit – 11th Grade) Honors Political Science will acquaint students with all aspects of American federal, state and local government. Included in this course will be the foundation of democracy, the legislative, executive and judicial branches of government along with their roles and functions, rights and responsibilities of American citizens, and political and economic systems found around the world. This course will encourage students to explore political issues and become active participants in American society. The content and course requirements of Honors Political Science are more rigorous and detailed than regular Political Science. Extensive proficiency in writing, reading and research is a necessary part of this course. The student should also possess excellent study skills, self-motivation and the ability to work well independently.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS (1 Credit – 11th Grade) This course provides an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. This course involves both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific case studies. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U. S. political reality. Students will be able to analyze and interpret basic data relevant to U.S. government and politics. Finally, students will understand typical patterns of political processes and behavior and their consequences. Students may take the optional AP test given in May of each year for possible college credit. 

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) UNITED STATES HISTORY (1 Credit – Senior Only Class) The Advanced Placement United States History class is available to seniors, and is designed to provide the student with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in United States History. In addition, students will learn to assess historical materials and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. As a course outcome, students will develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format. Fields examined in AP United States History include such topics as economic, cultural, social and intellectual history, in addition to political-constitutional and diplomatic history. Students may take the optional AP test given in May of each year for possible college credit. 

CRIMINOLOGY / ECONOMICS (1 Credit – Senior Only Elective) During the first nine weeks of this course, students will gain an understanding of the criminal justice system as it applies to themselves, society and the world. The course will familiarize the student with lawmakers, law enforcement, courts and the corrections system. Also covered will be the historical foundation of law, and how it affects the individual and society, the classification of crime by type and degree, the definitions and punishments of common criminal offenses, evidence, the due process, and the criminal court procedure. During the second nine weeks, students will gain an understanding of basic microeconomics principles as they apply to the students, society and other economics worldwide. Students will be taught to live in a world where they work, buy, sell and actively make economic choices. This course will familiarize students with scarcity and opportunity cost and how it is the foundation of all economics, resource ownership, the circular flow of a market economic system, understanding the price and effect and how it relates to the supply and demand of goods and services, extensive scheduling, graphing and rationalizing, profits and incentives to produce, and understanding taxes, along with money, banks and policy. Students will utilize classroom lectures and discussion, text reading and research, assignments and class presentations to attain a passing mark.

PSYCHOLOGY/SOCIOLOGY (1 Credit – Senior Only Elective) The purpose of the psychology portion of this course is to study both the behavior and mental processes of individuals. The topics within our study of psychology include: current methods of studying psychology, biological aspects of psychology, stages of human development and cognition, personality theories, and abnormal psychology. During the second phase of this course students will gain an understanding of sociology by examining human behavior within a broader social context. Students will learn the different methods of studying sociology through the examination of human socialization and the development of culture.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) PSYCHOLOGY (1 Credit – Junior & Senior Only Elective) The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of behavior and mental processes of human beings and animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with the major subfields within psychology, such as biological basis for behavior, sensation, perception, consciousness, learning cognition, motivation, development, personality, abnormal behavior, and social psychology. Students will also learn about the methods psychologists use in their science and practice.Students may take the optional AP test given in May of each year for possible college credit. 

SAFETY EDUCATION (.5 Credit – Sophomore Requirement – Opposite 10th Grade Gym) The primary goal of the Safety Education course is the prevention of accidents.  This course attempts to achieve this goal by spending 50% of the required time on driver education as it relates to the many forms of safety in everyday living. The course attempts to develop the proper attitudes, ideals and thought processes in students, as well as the necessary skills and knowledge to insure maximum safety in everyday lives.

NATIONAL ISSUES (1 Credit – Senior Only Elective) National Issues is an elective course that will deal with several topics of current national and international issues. Students will become involved directly in the discussion and solution of these issues. This course will also include a weekly presentation that will prepare graduates to successfully enter the adult world. Topics that will be covered include, but are not limited to, banking, insurance, financial planning, credit cards and loans, rent and leases, interviewing skills and resume building, college and scholarship searches.

 


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CPSCD Initiative,
Mar 8, 2016, 5:50 AM
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